Book List for Children

Here are several lists of some great books that you can read to children! Included from Read Across America are lists of hundreds of books, broken down into appropriate ages and stages of learning. These lists range from infancy all the way to adulthood! I am sure you will find a great book to read for any age group with these recommendations!

 

It’s so important for children to be exposed to books and other forms of literature beginning at a young age. Reading to children, beginning from early infancy, helps them to have a desire to be read to, sparks their imaginations and critical thinking skills, helps parents and caregivers bond with children and creates a lasting lifelong love for books.

 

 

Recommended books for reading to children: http://www.readaloudamerica.org/booklist.htm

It’s National Heatstroke Prevention Day!

Facebook Photo for National Heatstroke Prevention Day

 

Act Fast. Save a Life. If you see a child alone in a hot vehicle, call 911 or your local emergency number immediately. If the child is in distress due to heat, get that child out as quickly as possible. Cool the child rapidly by spraying the child with cool water or with water from a garden hose (an ice bath isn’t necessary or desirable). Visit www.safercar.gov/heatstroke for more information.

ACT: Heatstroke Awareness

Safe Kids Anson  is asking everyone to help protect kids from this preventable tragedy by remembering to ACT.

  • A: Avoid heatstroke-related injury and death by never leaving your child alone in a car, not even for a minute. And make sure to keep your car locked when you’re not in it so kids don’t get in on their own.
  • C: Create reminders by putting something in the back of your car next to your child such as a briefcase, a purse or a cell phone that is needed at your final destination. This is especially important if you’re not following your normal routine.
  • T: Take action. If you see a child alone in a car, call 911. Emergency personnel want you to call. They are trained to respond to these situations. One call could save a life.
  • For more information, click here; Heat Stroke Awareness FAQ 2015
  • FB image for heatstroke May 6 2015

Beyond Education Wars

APRIL 23, 2015

 

Photo

Darrisha Onry holds her one-month-old son Cedveon Miller while on a home visit with a nurse from the Nurse-Family Partnership program. Credit Andrea Morales for The New York Times

For the last dozen years, waves of idealistic Americans have campaigned to reform and improve K-12 education.

Armies of college graduates joined Teach for America. Zillionaires invested in charter schools. Liberals and conservatives, holding their noses and agreeing on nothing else, cooperated to proclaim education the civil rights issue of our time.

Yet I wonder if the education reform movement hasn’t peaked.

The zillionaires are bruised. The idealists are dispirited. The number of young people applying for Teach for America, after 15 years of growth, has dropped for the last two years. The Common Core curriculum is now an orphan, with politicians vigorously denying paternity.

K-12 education is an exhausted, bloodsoaked battlefield. It’s Agincourt, the day after. So a suggestion: Refocus some reformist passions on early childhood.

I say that for three reasons. First, there is mounting evidence that early childhood is a crucial period when the brain is most malleable, when interventions are most cost-effective for at-risk kids.

Researchers are finding that poverty can harm the brains of small children, perhaps because their brains are subjected to excessive cortisol (a stress hormone) and exposed less to conversation and reading. One study just published in Nature Neuroscience found that children in low-income families had a brain surface area on average 6 percent smaller than that of children in high-income families.

“Neuroscience tells us we’re missing a critical, time-sensitive opportunity to help the most disadvantaged kids,” notes Dr. Jack Shonkoff, an early childhood expert at the Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Growing evidence suggests what does work to break the poverty cycle: Start early in life, and coach parents to stimulate their children. Randomized controlled trials, the gold standard of evidence, have shown this with programs like Nurse-Family Partnership, Reach Out and Read, and high-quality preschool. These kinds of interventions typically produce cognitive gains that last a few years and then fade — but, more important, also produce better life outcomes, such as less crime, fewer teenage pregnancies, higher high school graduation rates, and higher incomes.

The second reason to focus on early interventions is that the low-hanging fruit has already been picked in the K-12 world. Charter schools like KIPP showed that even in high-poverty environments, students can excel. In New York City, which under Michael Bloomberg became a center for education reform, high school graduation rates rose to 66 percent in 2013 from 47 percent in 2005.

I support education reform. Yet the brawls have left everyone battered and bloodied, from reformers to teachers unions. I’m not advising surrender. Education inequity is America’s original sin. A majority of American children in public schools are eligible for free or reduced price lunches, and they often get second-rate teachers in second-rate schools — even as privileged kids get superb teachers. This perpetuates class and racial inequity and arises in part from a failed system of local school financing.

But fixing K-12 education will be a long slog, so let’s redirect some energy to children aged 0 to 5 (including prenatal interventions, such as discouraging alcohol and drug use among pregnant women).

That leads to my third reason: Early education is where we have the greatest chance of progress because it’s not politically polarized. New York City liberals have embraced preschool, but so have Oklahoma conservatives. Teacher unions will flinch at some of what I say, but they have been great advocates for early education. Congress can’t agree on much, but Republicans and Democrats just approved new funding for home visitation for low-income toddlers.

My perspective is shaped by what I’ve seen. Helping teenagers and adults is tough when they’ve dropped out of school, had babies, joined gangs, compiled arrest records or self-medicated.

But in Oklahoma, I once met two little girls, ages 3 and 4, whose great-grandmother had her first child at 13, whose grandmother had her first at 15, whose mom had her first at 13 and now has four children by three fathers. These two little girls will break that cycle, I’m betting, because they (along with the relative caring for them) are getting help from an outstanding early childhood program called Educare. Those two little girls have a shot at opportunity.

Even within early education, there will be battles. Some advocates emphasize the first three years of life, while others focus on 4-year-olds. Some seek to target the most at-risk children, while others emphasize universal programs.

But early childhood is not a toxic space, the way K-12 education is now. So let’s redeploy some of our education passions, on all sides, to an area where we just may be able to find common ground: providing a foundation for young children aged 0 to 5.

Source: http://www.nytimes.com/2015/04/23/opinion/nicholas-kristof-beyond-education-wars.html?_r=1

 

 

Champion for Children Nominations Requested

Anson County Partnership for Children seeks nominations for 2015 Champion for Children Award

 Wadesboro, NC Do you know someone who is helping make Anson County a better place to be a child and to raise a child? Acknowledge their excellence by nominating them to be the 2015 Champion for Children. The award will be presented at the 2015 Champions for Children Reception on Thursday, May 28th at First Presbyterian Church, Wadesboro, 6:00 pm.

Presented by Anson County Partnership for Children, this award will recognize an individual who:

• Champions the well-being of children in Anson County.

• Demonstrates commitment to providing a better future for children in Anson County.

• Works with others to raise awareness about children’s issues.

• Believes in building strong families.

• Demonstrates leadership on behalf of children in Anson County.

The Anson County Partnership for Children welcomes nominations from all facets of the community including professional and community leaders such as educators, doctors, police officers, ministers, tutors, coaches, or community volunteers.

Anson County Partnership for Children seeks nominations for 2015 Champion for Children Award

 Wadesboro, NC Do you know someone who is helping make Anson County a better place to be a child and to raise a child? Acknowledge their excellence by nominating them to be the 2015 Champion for Children. The award will be presented at the 2015 Champions for Children Reception on Thursday, May 28th at First Presbyterian Church, Wadesboro, 6:00 pm.

Presented by Anson County Partnership for Children, this award will recognize an individual who:

• Champions the well-being of children in Anson County.

• Demonstrates commitment to providing a better future for children in Anson County.

• Works with others to raise awareness about children’s issues.

• Believes in building strong families.

• Demonstrates leadership on behalf of children in Anson County.

The Anson County Partnership for Children welcomes nominations from all facets of the community including professional and community leaders such as educators, doctors, police officers, ministers, tutors, coaches, or community volunteers.

Nomination forms are available on www.ansonchildren.org, on the Partnership’s Facebook page or by contacting the Partnership at 704-694-4036. All nominations must be returned to the Anson County Partnership for Children no later than Friday, May 8, 2015 at 5:00 pm.

2015 Champion for Children – Nomination Form

 

Partnership Accepting Applications for NC Pre-K

Wadesboro, NC– Anson County Partnership for Children is accepting applications for the North Carolina Pre-Kindergarten for the 2015-2016 school year. NC Pre-K is a free high quality kindergarten readiness program that is proven to help four year olds gain basic skills for success in school. Children who are four years of age before August 31, 2015 are eligible to apply for the program.

“NC Pre-K is a wonderful opportunity for children in Anson County to prepare for success in school; however, availability is limited,” said Elaine B. Scarborough, Anson County Partnership for Children Executive Director. “Parents who are interested in enrolling their four year old children should apply as soon as possible.”

A new research study of the NC Pre-K Program conducted by UNC’s Frank Porter Graham Child Development Institute reports students enrolled in NC Pre-K show significant growth in language and literacy skills, math skills, general knowledge, and social skills.

The study also shows that children enrolled in the state’s Pre-K program continued to make gains even after leaving it. At the end of third grade, children from low-income families who had attended pre-k had higher reading and math scores on the North Carolina end-of-grade (EOG) tests than similar children who had not attended the state’s program.

A high priority is placed on serving children who are “at-risk.” A child is considered to be “at-risk” if the child’s family is at or below 75% of the state median income level or if a developmental delay has been identified. Enrollment is also open to students who have limited English proficiency, disabilities, chronic health conditions, or a parent who is active military service personnel.

NC Pre-K classes operate on a regular school calendar and are of the highest quality. The environment is designed to address emotional and social development, physical health, language development, and cognitive functioning. Teachers are highly qualified and hold a minimum of a BA/BS degree as well as specific early childhood credentials. Through incorporation of indoor and outdoor learning environments, students participate in active learning experiences to foster a lifetime love of education. Parents interested in learning more about the NC Pre-K program should contact Caroline Goins at 704-694-4036 (Ext 103) or caroline.goins@windstream.net or visit www.ansonchildren.org for an NC Pre-K application.

Study: Early childhood programs in NC reduce need for special education

Children enrolled in North Carolina’s state-supported early education programs are less likely to be placed in special education by third grade, Duke University researchers say.

The findings suggest that state investment in quality early childhood programs can prevent costly special education later. The study is published Tuesday in the American Educational Research Association’s journal, Educational Evaluation and Policy Analysis.

The researchers, Clara Muschkin, Helen Ladd and Kenneth Dodge, analyzed data about North Carolina special education placement and children’s access to two early childhood programs – NC Pre-K, which provides preschool for at-risk 4-year-olds, and Smart Start, which provides child health and family services to children from birth to age 5. The study covered the period from 1995 to 2010.

Access to the state’s prekindergarten program for 4-year-olds (at the 2009 funding of $1,110 per child) reduced the likelihood of third-grade special education placements by 32 percent, and access to Smart Start reduced the odds by 10 percent. Researchers saw a 39 percent reduction in special education placements after both early childhood programs.

Muschkin said the results are “yet another incentive” for policymakers to extend early education to children to avoid spending more on special education down the road.

“It costs about twice as much to educate a child in third grade who receives special education services,” Muschkin said. “If we were spending $8,000 for a regular third-grader, we would be spending twice that for a third-grader placed in special education.”

She said that the study confirmed the researchers’ hypothesis that there are conditions in young children that could be improved by high-quality early childhood education – including some learning issues and attention disorders. Such programs did not have an effect on physical or other serious disabilities, Muschkin said.

Sen. Jerry Tillman, an Archdale Republican and co-chairman of the education committee, said he wanted to look further at the study’s results. Many studies show quality prekindergarten’s positive impact on student performance in early grades, Tillman said, but some studies cast doubt on whether the gains are long-lasting.

Taking a close look

“I’m going to take a look at this one,” he said, “because I’ve never seen it associated with special education one way or the other.”

Tillman said special education is more costly because of smaller class sizes and special services for children.

The state’s NC Pre-K program, previously known as More at Four, has been the subject of political wrangling in recent years. A 2011 state budget provision limited preschool seats for at-risk children, prompting a legal challenge that ended up in the state Supreme Court. The legislature by then had amended the budget language to do away with the limit and a proposed co-payment.

The state has established prekindergarten for poor children as a way to ensure that all children in the state have access to a sound, basic education – the standard established by the courts in a long-running lawsuit about a school quality in North Carolina.

But not all poor children in the state have access to the state pre-K program. By one estimate, about 67,000 4-year-olds would qualify. The number of available slots has varied with the state’s funding year to year. Tillman said more slots were added in 2014.

In the Duke study, researchers found that the prekindergarten program cut down on the number of children with preventable disabilities, including attention disorders and mild mental disabilities. Smart Start, researchers said, helped reduce children classified as having a learning disability, which accounts for almost 40 percent of placements in special education.

Avoiding special ed

Muschkin said some children had avoided special education altogether, while others were able to move out of special ed to traditional classrooms sooner.

The study implied that even children who were not funded for an NC Pre-K slot benefited from being in the same classroom as others who received education according to the program’s high standards.

“It certainly would be a really cost-effective investment to increase access to the early childhood program,” Muschkin said. “We certainly aren’t reaching all the children who may come to school with disadvantages and all the children whose special needs might be taken care of early on and save the school system from having to provide services.”

Read more here: http://www.charlotteobserver.com/news/local/education/article9505994.html#storylink=cpy

Source: http://www.charlotteobserver.com/news/local/education/article9505994.html

2015 BARN BLAST PROGRAM

Get an early look at all the items you want to bid on here!!

 

2015 Barn Blast Program

It’s Barn Blast Time Again!

2014 Barn Blast

Tickets for the 9th annual Barn Blast fundraiser are available now at the Anson County Partnership for Children. The 2015 Barn Blast will be held on Friday, January 30 from 5:00 to 11:30 pm in the Ingram Room at SPCC’s Lockhart-Taylor Center in Wadesboro. This fundraising event features dinner, dancing, drinks, silent auctions, live auction and lots of western themed fun.

Reserved tables for 8 are available for $400 ($50 per ticket). General admission tickets are $60.00 each. After January 9, reserved tables increase to $480 ($60 per ticket) and general admission tickets will not be sold. Be sure to purchase your Barn Blast tickets before they sell out!

All profits from the Barn Blast are used in Anson County for the Partnership’s programs for young children. These include Dolly Parton’s Imagination Library which mails a book each month to over 1000 children in Anson County, as well as many other literacy and early childhood programs.

For tickets or more information about the 2015 Barn Blast, please call or come by the Anson County Partnership for Children, 117 South Greene Street, Wadesboro, 704 694-4036, www.ansonchildren.org.

 

 

 

New North Carolina Poll Finds Major Support for Early Childhood Education

NC Foundation picture

 

Bipartisan support for expanding Smart Start and NC Pre-K

RALEIGH, N.C. – A new bipartisan North Carolina poll finds that North Carolina voters view early childhood education as a critical issue in the state and across the nation. Majorities of Democrats, Republicans and Independents support investments in early childhood programs in the state – including expanding access to Smart Start, Pre-K, teacher training and home visiting programs.

More than four in five (83%) of North Carolina voters believe that investments in early childhood programs will benefit North Carolina’s economy in the short and long term. Voters ranked ensuring children get a strong start as a top priority for policymakers, second only to jobs and the economy and well ahead of reducing the tax burden on families. The poll was conducted by the bipartisan team of Public Opinion Strategies and Hart Research for the First Five Years Fund and the North Carolina Early Childhood Foundation

Voters are very concerned that children get a strong start in school and see high quality early childhood education as the answer. Three-quarters of state voters support expanding access to the NC Pre-K and Smart Start programs so that more children in the state can benefit from them. In addition, 88 percent want North Carolina to invest in training and classroom resources so that all pre-school and early elementary school teachers are able to teach each child in a way that addresses their individual needs and ensures they have a strong start in reading and school.

As the funding agent for Anson County’s Smart Start and North Carolina Pre-Kindergarten Program, the Anson County Partnership for Children is charged with ensuring that Anson County children get a strong start in school. Executive Director Elaine B. Scarborough says she is not surprised by the results the bipartisan North Carolina poll. “Citizens and businesses in Anson County are strong supporters of the work of the Anson County Partnership for Children on behalf of young children in our community. They understand the link between strong early childhood education and success in school and in the workforce. I’m sure our citizens support expanding access to early childhood programs in Anson County in order to better prepare our children to succeed in school.”

Nearly three-quarters of North Carolina voters (71 percent) support greater federal investment in early childhood education if it increased the deficit in the short term but paid for itself in the long term by improving children’s education, health and economic situations. Earlier this year, a national poll commissioned by The First Five Years Fund found that 71 percent of voters – including 60 percent of Republicans – support greater federal investments in early childhood education.

“North Carolina voters truly understand that when each child is given the best opportunity to succeed—to realize their potential and contribute as productive citizens—North Carolina prospers,” said NCECF Founding Executive Director Susan Perry-Manning. “Our state has a proud history of innovation and investment when it comes to early learning, and we know more needs to be done. Increased state and federal investments will mean more children can benefit from high-quality early learning programs, which in turn creates better education, health and economic outcomes for everyone in North Carolina.”

The mission of the North Carolina Early Childhood Foundation (NCECF) is to marshal North Carolina’s great people, ideas and achievements to build a foundation of opportunity and success for every child by the end of third grade. www.buildthefoundation.org

Anson County Partnership for Children is a non-profit public/private organization which was formed in 1996 in response to the North Carolina Smart Start initiative. The Partnership’s mission is “helping to make Anson County a better place to be a child and to raise a child.” For more information, contact Elaine B. Scarborough at 704-694-4036, www.ansonchildren.org.